If You’re Going To Do It, Do It Right – How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile

It’s another one of those, “If you’re going to do it at all, do it right” things.  It isn’t any harder to do a good job (you know I’m lying, but just a bit) on your LinkedIn profile, and the rewards will be much greater than doing half a job.
It’s also another one of those, if you put some effort into it, it will show people that you think this matters.  A great LinkedIn profile conveys the message that:- you’re a consummate professional, as you care about your image,
– you take this network seriously and have respect for the business world, and fellow professionals online,
– you know how to take advantage of the best opportunities, and
– since you know how to network online properly, this demonstrates clearly that you’re Internet savvy.Connections and future connections on LinkedIn will be impressed, and take you more seriously, rather than the opposite, which is to relegate you to Deep Web oblivion.

Being impressive and influential is what LinkedIn is about (and getting dinner invites from long lost colleagues, but that’s another story*).  You have to offer something, other than a firm handshake, to get successful and worthwhile connections.  As I said in another post, LinkedIn is for professionals and you shouldn’t be here if you’re not serious about your work and your profession.
As they say (or do they?)
Play or get on your bike
Granada, Spain – 2007
As you’re reading this, you’re serious, so here are a few tips to making the most of your profile:

1.   Complete your profile 100%.  According to LinkedIn, by fully completing your profile, you will be “40 times more likely to receive opportunities”.  Well I suppose they would say that, wouldn’t they. But even if that statistic isn’t quite that high, “opportunities” should be an incentive for you to make the effort.

2.   A nice photo please.  And look happy to be here. Yes, it will give away your age, your hair colour, your ethnicity, etc.  They were bound to find out sooner or later that you’re a gorgeous, red-haired librarian with a few freckles.  The fact is, faces are easier to remember than names and these memories also last longer.  I’m not making this up.  This memory bias is known as the Picture Superiority Effect.  Another reason to use a photo is that your face is your brand and logo.  You should be like BMW//Apple/Twitter and reinforce your brand by using this photo on multiple sites.

 3.  Include all the companies you’ve worked for, your higher education, any awards and of course all publications (if you have any).  Not only are recruiters looking for these key items but so are your ex-classmates and ex-colleagues. Make looking for you easy.  You’re on LinkedIn.  You want to be found.

4.   Include your website, blog links and Twitter feeds.  Who are you, what have you done, what do you have to say?  Inquiring minds want to know!  Besides you put all these details on the Internet, so make use of them.

If you don’t like LinkedIn you could
go retro and stick a note on this board
Ottawa, Canada – 2004

5.   Update and change your profile whenever necessary.  Your career doesn’t stay still in the real world (I hope).  You’re not stagnate.  Don’t grow moss on LinkedIn either.

6.   Write in the 1st person not the 3rd.  Since you’re using LinkedIn, it’s obvious that you aren’t royalty.  Be real and sound genuine.

7.   Acronyms.  Don’t assume everyone knows what you mean.  Please be clear and explain.  Also you never know what terms people are using for searching.  For example – CA has over 680 meanings including everything from Chartered Accountant to Cost Analysis and including Combat Aircraft.

8.   Think about the quality of your network.  Some people still feel it’s about big numbers.  I feel it’s about the quality and the productivity of the connections you have.  The 50 people you know and who would recommend you, are more valuable than 675 who barely remember you. When you start on LinkedIn, you can import your professional contacts from your email directories.  You aren’t among strangers on LinkedIn, as your colleagues/peers/even friends are here.

That’s enough for you to contemplate for now (and be getting on with).

Good luck.  Any questions, you know where I am.

J
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2 thoughts on “If You’re Going To Do It, Do It Right – How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile

  1. Well, I asked for pointers and I got 8 of them. And since I'm all new to LinkedIn I'll follow all of them to the letter (and if anything goes wrong I'll blame you).Nah, just kiddin.Thanks a lot for great advice, Julie. :)/ Viggo

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